There is no simple answer: highlights of the CPS statement on "Antenatal counselling and management for anticipated extremely preterm birth"

Last modified by Ann Watkins on 2017/05/04 20:43

Drs. Lemyre and Moore, lead authors of this CPS statement, will describe the process of its development and highlight several key points and recommendations found in the statement. The statement deals with an ethically challenging situation where parents face a life and death decision around the care options (broadly, intensive care or palliative care) for their infant. The statement's main goals are to promote:

1) consideration by the healthcare providers of the multiple prognostic factors and prognostic uncertainty in every case;
2) shared decision making, and;
3) excellent communication with families by healthcare providers.



Drs. Lemyre and Moore, lead authors of this CPS statement, will describe the process of its development and highlight several key points and recommendations found in the statement. The statement deals with an ethically challenging situation where parents face a life and death decision around the care options (broadly, intensive care or palliative care) for their infant. The statement's main goals are to promote:

1) consideration by the healthcare providers of the multiple prognostic factors and prognostic uncertainty in every case;
2) shared decision making, and;
3) excellent communication with families by healthcare providers.

Drs. Lemyre and Moore, lead authors of this CPS statement, will describe the process of its development and highlight several key points and recommendations found in the statement. The statement deals with an ethically challenging situation where parents face a life and death decision around the care options (broadly, intensive care or palliative care) for their infant. The statement's main goals are to promote:

1) consideration by the healthcare providers of the multiple prognostic factors and prognostic uncertainty in every case;
2) shared decision making, and;
3) excellent communication with families by healthcare providers.

Click here to download the presentation slides.

blemyre.jpgDr. Brigitte Lemyre completed her medical school at Université de Sherbrooke in 1993, and Pediatrics residency at the same institution in 1997.  After a short time working as a consultant pediatrician in a community hospital, she completed a fellowship in Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine at McMaster University in 2000.  Dr. Lemyre has been a member of the Departments of Pediatrics at CHEO and Gynecology, Obstetrics and Newborn Care at The Ottawa Hospital since 2001. 

Dr. Lemyre has led clinical trials examining the effect of a topical anesthetic to reduce pain during placement of central venous lines and blood work (CIHR grant and PSI grant), comparing different non-invasive forms of respiratory support in extremely premature infants (CIHR grant) and comparing different surfactants in premature infants (CHAMO Innovation Grant).  

She is currently co-leading initiatives aiming to provide better counselling and support to parents at high risk of delivering extremely prematurely, using a shared decision making framework. Dr. Lemyre has been a member of the Fetus and Newborn Committee, Canadian Pediatric Society for the last 2 years, and been involved in updating and creating several position statements.  

2015 GMoore Headshot.jpgDr. Gregory Moore is an academic neonatologist practicing at the two hospitals in Ottawa that have level 3 neonatal intensive care units – the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario and The Ottawa Hospital. After obtaining his medical degree from the University of Western Ontario, he completed his Paediatrics residency and the first 2 years of his Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine fellowship at the University of Ottawa in Ontario, Canada. He went on to enjoy a final enriching fellowship year at the Royal Women’s Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. He returned to Ottawa in 2009 as an attending neonatologist and an assistant professor on the clinician-teacher track through the University of Ottawa. In 2016, he was promoted to the associate professor level. He is a Clinical Investigator with the CHEO Research Institute and Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. His areas of academic interest are bioethics with a focus on working with families when their baby may be born at an extremely low gestational age, and post-graduate medical education. Outside of ‘hospital life’, he enjoys time with his wife and four children and competing as a national level Masters cyclist.

Created by Ann Watkins on 2017/03/13 19:11